Hi, I am

Yeo Chai Heng

 

I was born in and am living in Singapore,

an island city-state with beautiful skylines.

 

I am currently employed as a Presales Specialist @ SAP

 

I am also a Management of Technology student @ NUS

I build things with tools from the computing world:

I write on my blog:

How to use threading.Condition to wait for several Flask-APScheduler one-off jobs to complete execution in your Python 3 application

Previously, I discussed how to use Flask-APScheduler in your Python 3 Flask application to run multiple tasks in parallel, from a single HTTP request.

When we run jobs as discussed in that post, jobs are ran once by the underlying ApScheduler instance. In addition, our Flask endpoint return the HTTP response back to the HTTP client as soon as the jobs are scheduled.

If we do not want the HTTP client to know the outcome of the jobs within that HTTP call, then we are good. But what if we want to include any errors that the jobs encounter in the same HTTP response?

In such a situation, we will need a mechanism to wait for the one-off jobs to complete execution before returning that response.

Given that in mind, this post shows how we can use threading.Condition to wait for several Flask-APScheduler one-off jobs to complete execution.

How to create an interval task that runs periodically within your Python 3 Flask application with Flask-APScheduler

Previously, I talked about how to use Flask-APScheduler in your Python 3 Flask application to run multiple tasks in parallel, from a single HTTP request.

If you wish to run long running tasks triggered by an HTTP request, then that post will help you do so.

However, what if you want to run jobs periodically without blocking your Flask HTTP server from serving HTTP requests?

In this case, you will want to run an interval task with Flask-APScheduler.

Given that, let's look at how we can use Flask-APScheduler to create an interval task within your Python 3 Flask application.

How to put your Raspberry Pi server on the internet with ngrok

As I had mentioned in how to host multiple websites from home, a typical network architecture looks like the following:

Home network architecture In such a case, we will need our router to hold a public IP address and perform port forwarding for our home servers.

However, there can be cases where we do not have the environment to put our server on the internet.

In such a situation, you will find ngrok useful. Since ngrok accepts traffic on a public address and relays that traffic through to the ngrok process running on your machine, you can put your server on the internet easily.

ngrok demo diagram

Given that, let's look at how you can put your Raspberry Pi server on the internet with ngrok.

How to setup a Raspberry Pi security camera with motionEyeOS

When you want to turn your unused Raspberry Pi into a security camera, you can take a look at motionEyeOS.

So what is motionEyeOS? In short, motionEyeOS is a Linux distribution that turns your single board computer into a video surveillance system. Therefore, it is convenient to setup a Raspberry Pi security camera with motionEyeOS.

Given these points, let us look at how we can setup a Raspberry Pi security camera with motionEyeOS.

That's all for now...

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